Woodworking Shop Safety

10 Safety Tips to Post in Your Shop

  1. Think Before You Cut – The most powerful tool in your shop is your brain, use it. Thinking your cuts and movements through before acting can help save both fingers and scrap wood.
  2. Keep a Clean Shop – A cluttered shop is an accident waiting to happen. Keeping your shop clean will help protect you, and your tools, from tripping hazards.
  3. Avoid Distractions – Pay attention to your actions. Looking up to watch the shop TV or visitor can result in your hand contacting the blade. Always wait until you have completed your cut before you take your eyes off the blade.
  4. Don’t Rush – Keep in mind that this is just a hobby and take a break when you feel rushed or frustrated with a project. Mistakes happen when we rush to complete a job.
  5. Don’t Force It – If your saw is resisting the cut, stop and see what’s wrong. A misaligned rip fence or improperly seated throat plate can sometimes cause a board to get stuck in mid cut.
  6. Forcing the board in these situations may cause kickback or contact with the blade. Take a moment to evaluate the situation and determine the problem.
  7. Protect Yourself – Wearing the proper shop protection is an important part of safe tool operation. Goggles, Ear Protection, and Lung Protection should be used when operating tools. Use push sticks when working close to the blade and make sure the tool’s safety features are in place.
  8. Let the Tool Stop – Giving the power tool time to wind down after a cut is an often-overlooked safety mistake. Even without power, the spinning blade can still do a lot of damage.
  9. Fumes and Dust – Solvent fumes and airborne dust can present health and explosion hazards. Care should be taken to ensure a supply of fresh air and use only explosion proof vent fans.
  10. Wear Appropriate Clothing – Loose clothing or hair can get caught in power tools and cause severe injury.
  11. No Alcohol – Too many woodworkers have been injured because Alcohol clouded their judgment. Avoid their mistakes and wait until after you’re done in the shop.



Weekend Projects – Aug 24, 2015

Box Joint Jig
Box Joint Jig

This was my project for this last weekend. I have a bunch of pictures. As you will find I am not much on writing and am still trying to get comfortable with the whole blogging thing. So hopefully you will stay with me and we’ll see if I get any better.

The plans for this project can be found at http://www.plansnow.com/. They were also in one of the back issues of WoodSmith mag. I don’t remember the issue number.

I did modify the plans a bit. I added a track for adjusting for miter slots. I may want to use this with my router table as well.

Now that I have finished this and have make some cuts. I am thinking I may make a different type that will only cut one size. This one will be great for making different size box joints. But I want one that I can just throw it on the saw and cut without adjusting it and just think about the project at hand.

So I will update you on next Weekends Projects. The plan is to make a wall mounted portable tape dispenser organizer. Along with a wood floor desk carpet mat for my office. What project are you going to be working? See you next week.

Here's where I started, with some scraps and a couple dollars of hardware.
Here’s where I started, with some scraps and a couple dollars of hardware.

More scrap and hardware.
More scrap and hardware.

More of some of the scrap wood I will be using.
More of some of the scrap wood I will be using.
I started with some Oak scrap I had from a desk I got for free and about $8 of hardware. I had the track that was a gift from my kids. Oh I did spend an additional $3.59 for some Oak trim for the backer boards.

 

I was going to use hardboard as the plans had. But the smallest I could find was 4’x8′ at around $15. I got a trim Oak strip 1-1/2″ x 48″ and cut them to size at 1/5th the cost.

Backer boards. $3.59 1-1/2" x 48" cut to 5" chunk and mount hole drilled
Backer boards. $3.59 1-1/2″ x 48″ cut to 5″ chunk and mount hole drilled

 

Dry fit Fence setting on base.
Dry fit Fence setting on base.

Dry fit movable fence setting on base.
Dry fit movable fence setting on base.

Dry fit both movable and non-movable fence setting on base.
Dry fit both movable and non-movable fence setting on base.

Dry fit on my saw
Dry fit on my saw

Dry fit on my saw
Dry fit on my saw

Dry fit on my saw
Dry fit on my saw

Dry fit test run
Dry fit test run

Dry fit test run
Dry fit test run

Test cuts
Test cuts

Playing around
Playing around

Playing around
Playing around

Playing around
Playing around

Finished and put together
Finished and put together

Finished and put together
Finished and put together

Finished and put together
Finished and put together

Finished and put together. With backer boards
Finished and put together. With backer boards

Finished and put together
Finished and put together

Finished and put together. Saw mounted
Finished and put together. Saw mounted

Finished and put together. Saw mounted
Finished and put together. Saw mounted

Finished and put together. Saw mounted
Finished and put together. Saw mounted

Finished and put together. Saw mounted
Finished and put together. Saw mounted

 




Weekend Projects

Welcome to my weekends!

I have not been very good about updating my blog. Nor have I been very good about getting project done!

So I am planning on trying to list the projects I am going to work on before the weekend and then update what was able to get done on the fallowing Monday. This will hopefully keep me on track and get things done!

I hope that you stop by and see what I have been working on from time to time. And maybe even motivate you to do something on your next weekend!.




Weekend Projects – Aug 17, 2015

This is what I did this weekend!

First off, sorry about the pictures. I did not know they were not very good until today.

I finished off the charging station I need to build. I thought I had the plans in a PDF to upload, but I can’t put my hands on them. Here is the link to where I got them. “http://www.hertoolbelt.com/cordless-drill-storage-charging-station/” I did do some mods to the plans. Due to the size of my nailer, I had to cutout some of the hanger. I also wanted to use up some of my growing scrap wood collection. So I glued and planed some hardwood flooring I had to make it. Other than time it only cost me some glue, finish nails and some mineral oil. I think it turned out ok.

Charging Station
Charging Station

Charging Station
Charging Station

Charging Station
Charging Station

Charging Station
Charging Station

Charging Station
Charging Station

Charging Station
Charging Station

I also finished off these clamps. I have found a good supply of hardwood flooring (cheap!) and have been using it to make different projects. But it’s been a pain in the rear to clamp. So I’ve wanted some of these double pull clamps for some time, but they are not cheap. They run around $30 each. SO I decided I would give it a try and make my own. I had some scrap metal from another project. Well after all said and done I spent about $20 to make a set of clamps. However after looking back $30 each is not a bad price. It took the better part of a week to make these.

Clamps
Clamps

Clamps
Clamps

I’ve also started working on a new box joint jig. These plans are from WoodSmith/ShopNotes (Jigs_Plan__Jig__Box_Joint). I’ve cut most the wood to size. I am using some scrap oak that I got from a broken desk. I did spend about $8 on the hardware. But I found I did not need that as well. I already had it all. So if I would have just checked what I had it would have been free. I’ll update on my next post, next Monday!

Box Joint Jig
Box Joint Jig

 

So what did you do this weekend?

 

 

 




10 easy steps to adjust the fence to be parallel to the miter slot.

  1. First get a piece of ¾”x 4”x17” or longer hardwood. It should fit in to your miter slot without slop. If it does not fix without slop get a different piece of wood or use a shim on the side away from the fence.
  2. Now loosen the screws that hold the fence.
  3. Unlock the fence if needed.
  4. Side the fence against the board in the miter slot.
  5. Take some clamps and clamp the fence to the board in the miter slot.
  6. Lock the fence.
  7. Tighten the screws that hold the fence.
  8. Remove the clamps
  9. Unlock the fence
  10. Remove the wood from the miter slot.

Now if your blade is aligned to the miter slot as it should be, you fence is not parallel to the blade and it should only taken you a couple of minutes to do this.

This works for me.